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in benghazi. the goal, to protect the people of libya. now a senior u.s. military official tells cnn the u.s. has launched its first air strikes in the western part of the country. those u.s. tomahawk missiles have landed in the area around tripoli and misrata. >> and this as moammar gadhafi sends letters to the u.n. and its allies warning them to stay out of his country. >> meanwhile, the leader behind the u.n. resolution gathered in paris today to map out the road ahead. french warplanes are circling over libya, enforcing that yuu. sanctioned no-fly zone. >> and they have flexed military muscle firing on a libyan military vehicle. our senior international correspondent, nic robertson, is joining us right now from tripoli. nic, there were some reports that there were loud booming noises. now perhaps we know in large part why. perhaps as a result of those u.s. tomahawk missile strikes? >> reporter: yeah. it's not possible for us to confirm it at the moment in tripoli. there certainly would be a number of targets here. the former u.s. air base east of the city here houses not only some of the
military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today saying he's committed to the u.n. resolution on libya. yesterday, he complained the campaign was too broad and civilians were killed. >>> libya freed four new york times journalists today. the four cro
libya since the operation was launched 24 hours ago. >> u.s. joint chiefs of staff chairman mike mullen says most of gadhafi's air defense systems and airfields have been taken out. libyan ground forces have also been hit. >> the no-fly zone is effectively in place. we have combat air patrol or aircraft over benghazi and we will have them there for on a 24/7 basis. move that to the west and he hasn't flown any aircraft for the last two days. the whole goal here is to get it in place. two, be in a position so that he is unable to massacre his own civilians and that we effect the humanitarian support. from that standpoint, the initial operations have been very effective. >> besides the u.s. britain and france countries taking part in the libyan operation include italy, spain, canada, and qatr. >> gadhafi vowed to fight back what he calls terrorists attacking his country. >> we be victorious. we will achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. have you the devil on your side. >> he called coalition nation it is new nazis and promised a, quote, long drawn war. >> nic rob
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
the american navy. u.s. president obama who was in brazil for trade discussions talked about the discussion to take military action. >> the u.s. of force is not our first choice. and it's not a choice i make lightly. but we cannot stand idly by when a tyrant tells his people there will be no mercy. >> to take a look now at this map. this gives you an idea of where coalition strikes were aimed. also the areas of the no fly zone. the main areas are interest are been goes benghazi and the heart of tripoli. moammar gadhafi addressed his people and the world, saying libya will wipe out the aggressors from the united states, britain and france. >> we will be victorious, achieve victory on behalf of the people. we have allah with us. you have the devil on your side. what right have you got to attack our people? who gave you that right? who are you? you backward barbaries. this is an aggression that has no justification. this atrocity. we will hold to our land, to our rights. we will fight inch by inch. this land has been stained with t the plod of our people, our leaders, our forefathers. >> now t
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
to be the targets here, but that there are ground force near the sites where the u.s. is targeting, that they could become casualties at this point. do you think, given what we do know about libya, this would be enough to motivate people to switch sides, to back off, to rethink their support of libya's strongman? >> as i said, it's really about momentum right now. if there's any sense the momentum is shifting against the gadhafi regime, we're likely to see additional defections. the only thing that reverses it is that gadhafi was still strong and he had a lot of tools as his disposal. it could happen. when you look at the u.n. resolution, everybody's been saying it's about civilians. but if you look at the text, it gives the international community and those carrying out the commission is it gives them tools. every target in libya is a legitimate target if it's tied to civilians. the mission is about defending civilians. you've already stated the u.s., the europeans, most of those who are part of the coalition really don't think they can live with gadhafi as president of libya. they see him has hav
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
forces today, and the regime is offering a reward, almost half a million u.s., for the capture of a top opposition figure. we have new cnn video coming in from ras lanuf where rebels with fighting to hold their ground. government troops are using planes and heavy artillery to try to retake the eastern oil city. in the western city of zawiya, libyan television showed government supporters cheering in the streets today, but there are now unconfirmed reports that rebels have retaken the main square there. after days of heavy fighting, it's almost impossible to get through to anyone in zawiya for any independent confirmation of what's going on there. today gadhafi is also sending a new warning to the united states and its allies as they consider imposing a no-fly zone over libya. he promises that all libyans will fight back against what he calls an act of aggression and an attempt to control libya's oil. >> translator: it will be clear aggression. it will also be clear that the intentions are to control libya's oil, choke libya's liberty, land and people. all of the libyans carry weapons so
this sunday morning with "operation odyssey dawn" well under way. french, u.s., and british coalition forces began hammering key libyan installations late on saturday to enforce a no-fly zone newly approved by the u.n. security council. responding to the fighter jets and cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi's defenses have been peppering libya's skies with anti-aircraft fire. here now the very latest. the pentagon saying that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have slammed into libyan targets aimed primarily at air defense systems. despite the ways of attacks libyan leader gadhafi remains defiant, condemning the coalition strikes and urging people around the world to aid in libya's defense. the british prime minister, david cameron, calls the allied effort against colonel gadhafi the right thing to do. britain's defense secretary says british fighter jets flew 4,800 kilometers from their base in southeastern england to their targets in libya. the country's longest bombing run since the 1982 falklands war. prime minister cameron says the uk's involvement is justified.
of that u.s. fighter jet and we are happy to report both crew members are safe and in u.s. hands. we are covering the angles from the points on the map. nic robertson in tripoli and chris lawrence at the pentagon and retired navy captain alec frazier is here at the cnn center. chris, what is the pentagon saying about this? >> reporter: well, they are saying, bottom line, carol, is that both of these crew members are now off libyan soil and safely back in u.s. hands, but the story of how they got there, is just fascinating. this crew took off from a base in italy overnight and they were on a strike mission. in other words, they weren't necessarily just patrolling. this was a fighter jet specifically designed to go after some of moammar gadhafi's air defense systems. overnight at some point, the military plane got into some mechanical problems and both of the crew members ejected. their chutes worked just fine but they landed in different places. the pilot was picked up by an osprey. that was sitting off the coast about a hundred miles on the "uss kearsarge." the marines, the 26 marine
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
with urge see. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with nato allies in paris. she says the u.s. will not waver in its efforts to assist libyan civilians and enforce the security council resolution as gadhafi forces continue to defy calls for a cease-fire. >> the realty on the ground tells a very different story. colonel gadhafi continues to defy the world. his attacks on civilians go on. we will support an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures. >> the latest from benghazi shows tanks approaching the city have stopped as thick black smoke rises from the rebel stronghold this. i'm richard lui live in new york. reports this hour, french defense officials saying french fighter jets have fired on libyan military vehicles, that's what we understand now. we're just getting that in. meanwhile, secretary of state clinton saying that military action to enforce a security council resolution on libya has just begun. an intense aerial operation will soon start in libya. jim maceda is live in the stronghold of tripoli. jim? >> reporter: hi there, richard. yes, you just m
an international coalition as it takes all necessary measures. >> with u.s. allies taking the lead president obama is being briefed on developments while he is in brazil. >> our consensus was strong and resolve clear. the people of libya must be protected and in the absence of an immediate end to the violence against civilians, our coalition is prepared to act and act with urgency. >> the latest from benghazi shows tanks approaching the city have stopped as thick, black smoke rises from the rebel stronghold. with me right now from cairo, egypt is nbc's richard engel. richard, from your perspective, from your vantage point, how optimistic is the arab world that they can stop the violence toward civilians in libya? >> this is a, you have to understand what's going on in libya in the context of the wider middle east. the middle east is going through an incredible period of flux with revolts and uprisings and revolutions from north africa stretching all the way to the arabian peninsula. all arab governments are in the cross hairs right now, very unpopular with their people. there have been successful
, particularly if the u.s. would have been involved, we would have seen cad's forces melt away -- gadhafi's forces melt away. nobody wants to die for him particularly. and now that the offense sieve coming close to victory, it may not be enough. in which case even if you're using air power to strike ground targets, you have to go in low. you have to take out the air defense side. you have a wider war without putting a single boot on the ground. but if that doesn't work, if the gadhafi forces don't retreat which is what the president said he had to do, now what? how do you force him out? how do you force him back? how do you kill him in pat's terms without putting american troops as well as others, one would hope, on the ground to see to it? i don't know the answer. i don't see how you do it from the air alone. >> karen, dan, as well as pat, stands -- stand by. jim maceda is on the ground watching what we've been talking about and what was confirmed by president sarkozy, and that is that sorties began three our four hours ago. jim, what are you seeing now? >> reporter: well, from our perch
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
it every day. and then they leave. you know, is it is hard to take a city as the u.s. learned in iraq. and i think to pacify a whole town like that, may be more than they want to do right now. sometimes it seems like they're making an example of zawiyah. i don't know how much longer that can go on. >> and arwa, from your vantage point which is in benghazi, far to the east of tripoli, how organized are the opposition forces? not politically so much, because it seeps like they're getting more organized, but miltaf rily. >> they're struggling. they don't really know how to lay out a tactical battle plan. they've tried to form a military council that is meant to bring together all the various elements they have on the ground and the front line, they do realize that they don't necessarily have the upper hand when it cops to experience, training and when it comes to the weapons that they do have at their disposal, there was a few days ago, the optimism amongst leaders. it would be a fairly straightforward march toward tripoli. they're encountering a much tougher battle they had. i think a b
of migrant workers have fled libya. the u.s., britain and tunisia are providing planes. egypt is providing ships. the u.k. in the last hour, the opposition labour party has won the election in the north of england, taking 61% of the vote. parts of the governing coalition, the liberal democrats, the war's second in the general election last year, where six -- who were second in the general election last year, 6th.were >> the labor party has replaced a man convicted of using parliamentary expenses. a paratrooper, an officer in the british army, last year's serving in afghanistan is the new m p year in south and york sure -- here in south yorkshire earning. anything less would of been embarrassing. it has been a very bad night for the liberal democrats. they have slipped from second place in the general election last year to 6th, barely mastering 1000 votes for their candidate. it has been embarrassing for him personally and humiliating for the liberal democrats the will see this as the first sign of what they can expect in some parts of the u.k. as the cup that the government, the coalition
on during a calm day at the wind farm. heated 57 million u.s. homes. simmered grandma's chicken noodle soup. melted tons of recycled glass. roasted millions of coffee beans. provided electricity for nearly 29 million home computers. heated your bathwater. cooked your takeout. lit your way home. we helped america import less of its energy. cleared the air by burning cleaner than other fuel sources, with less pollutants and no mercury. and tomorrow, we could do even more. we're cleaner, domestic, abundant and ready now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power today. learn more at anga.us. >>> tonight, the battle for libya is intensifying as america considers military action in that country. moammar gadhafi continues to claim victories that do not exist. gadhafi's latest claims, versus the facts on the ground. gadhafi claims they've taken this city of misrata. local residents say they have not. you're going to hear from a man who's pinned down there. the small arms and molotov cocktails. they have nothing to fight with, he says, and nothing left to lose. the man you are going to hear fr
. clearly they need help but u.s. defense secretary says countries other than the u.s. can step in with training. robert gates is on capitol hill amid new revelations of cia people gathering facts and cultivating contacts on the battlefield. here's a bit of what he told the house arms services committee. >> i can't speak to any cia activities but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states military, there will be no boots on the ground. >> now i want to show you a libyan city that's far from rebel territory but a battleground in every sense. misrata, which we've already mentioned there in yellow. almost from the start of this uprising, misrata has been under siege from government tank, artillery, even snipers. an independent reporting has been all but impossible in fact we don't even know who controls misrata anywhere but cnn's frederik pleitgen managed to enter the city yesterday and when he found, well you will have to see from yourself. fred, joins us from a ship not far from the misrata port. fred, tell us about your odyssey the
here? >> we are feeling normal, ok. no problem. >> and in the east, the first loss -- a u.s. f-15e eagle jet fighter. the airline said it was not shut down, but suffered mechanical failure. and the fight for control of misrata goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic. >> i have no light, electricity in the hospital. i am working with a generator. 1973 -- i have civilians dying every day to day. >> know when dying in this bombing last night. the libyan government insists that many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes. it might well be true. we have asked for evidence. so far, they have not provided. bbc news, tripoli. plexus the united states is -- >> the united states is keen to relinquish its leadership role in the military campaign. president obama and prime minister cameron and presidents are cozy agreed that nato's -- president sarkozy agreed that nato felt military structures should take the leading role. president obama has been on the phone to paris and london. >> yes, if he is doing a
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
. >> i think it's also an issue for journal education. i think at least in the u.s., almost 2/3 of students in journalist school are female. >> primarily female? >> i think to some extent, it's a matter of giving them the training and incentive and also for female faculty to mentor young journalist students so they have in their head the idea that maybe they can do that. also going back to barbara's issue about skills or confidence. i think it takes a particular tenacity to be an investigative reporter. you have to be willing to stick with something to get your foot in the door. i had a student -- i used to teach investigative reporting as one the journalism courses that i taught. and my most aggressive student was a female. and even on the story assignment for class, she found out this guy wasn't going to give her an interview. she found out what time they came to work, and she was there to meet him at 7 a.m. when she arrived. she interviewed him outside of the door of his office building because he wouldn't give her an interview. i think it takes a certain amount. it can sta
. they were followed by more than 100 cruise missiles fired by u.s. and u.k. warships. the u.s. and britainan have fired 124 tom hack missiles at libyan air strikes. that was as of sunday night local team. a libyan army spokesman called for a immediate cease-fire, but the forces lining up against it don't seem inclined to respond to that. we want to get analysis on this with the professor of international relation tiz london school of economics. thank you very much for being with us. first of all, what is the situation -- let's talk a little bit about what the arab league has been doing right now. it's almost as if they're throwing a spanner in the works. are they? >> they're getting cold feet. you have seen in the last few days. while we accepted a no fly zone, but we have never said yes for massive bombing. for the potential of civilian casualties, for the escalation of the coalition golds. this is the reality. arab television, arab viewers now have been exposed to two days of bombings, and you can see -- >> but they knew they were getting into because the security council resolution 1973 s
rebels. a spokesman says the u.s. won't send weapons to a post office box in eastern libya. momentum for a no-fly zone is building today at the united nations. nato has begun 24-hour surveillance over libya. >> civil rights groups are angry over president obama's guantanamo bay flip-flop. he is ordering military tribunals to resume for three dozen gitmo detainees. another 47 will be held indefinitely without trial. critics say legal safeguards for detainees are window dressing on the bush administration policy. >>> spanish authorities plan an autopsy on the body of an american student in madrid. friends last saw austin bice ten days ago when he left a night club alone. bice's body was found in a river not far from the night club. detectives say there are no obvious signs of foul play. >>> joran van der sloot's lawyer says he's going to argue temporary insanity in the death of 21-year-old peruvian woman last year. the goal is a reduced charge and lighter sentence. van der sloot is also the prime suspect in the disappearance of american teenager natalee holloway in aruba. >>> a u.s. im
] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> more now on libya from the u.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rise. she spoke to reporters for about 20 minutes at the white house before the daily briefing. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. as i mentioned this morning, we have with us today the united states ambassador to the united nations susan rice and was in a meeting with the president and u.n. secretary general and i would like her to speak about that meeting and she'll take questions from you and i'll step aside. thanks. >> thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i want to give you a brief readout of the president's meeting with the u.n. secretary general. as you might expect, significant portion of that meeting was devoted to discussing the situation in libya. the u.n. has played a positive and very important role in efforts to end the bloodshed there and hold the gaddafi regime accountable and support the libyan people. in libya, the united nations is demonstrating the indispensible role it can play in advancing our interests and defending ou
-- to determine the location of the deceased. >> but teams from a number of nations, including the u.k., the u.s.a., japan, taiwan, korea, china, new zealand -- they typically work in their own national units. where possible we have tried but teams and in areas where they can focus on places we know some of their countrymen are liable to be located. they work on a shift roster. they do 30 minutes on, 30 minutes all. they rotate. they're the most amazing, dedicated people. they have reduced risk to a minimum. risk that would be beyond anything we would normally accept in our lives. and they have focused on one thing -- with great optimism and a degree of hope he reads from the beginning -- and they still have that now. they still think light of the book may be somewhere." and that is the way they work. >> the latest headlines for you this hour. the libyan air force claims they are launching a new attack and in eastern libya. gaddafi is being investigated for possible crimes against humanity. president obama is sending aircraft to aid refugees fleeing libya peary had hundreds more -- fleeing libya
holds a minute of silence for those who died in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity supplies to all areas. humanitarian assistance must be allowed to reach the people of libya. let me be clear. these terms are not negotiable. >> in the libyan capital of tripoli, there is dismay and anger
. it is interesting the last major tournament sampras played was the u.s. open in 2002. he won the final against agassi. they were back together there. >> is this for charity or money? >> charity, interesting i think it is just for charity. exhibition match. the fans loved it. >> thank you. you are watching bbc world news. still to come jane russell a hollywood star has died. >> more than 5,000 people have been left homeless by the landslide that swept through the boliv bolivian capital. the president has promised new housing. >> two days since the landslide that swept away the area and still the weaken ed properties that remain are collapsing. in this part of lapaz infrastructure has been totally destroyed. the roads now lead nowhere and everywhere people have lost almost everything. juanita has lived here for years with her family making ends meet by selling rice and cookies from a small kiosk. like everything else, that is now in ruins. >> the entire area has disappeared. so many people have only the shirts on their back. i had a small business. it was my we will life. it only allowed me to
international as we reach our audience around the world in the u.s. and beyond. now we understand that while the president is speaking, he was just touching on what this revolution that may have been unfolding in various parts of the middle east, including that of libya, we're actually going to go to libya right now. because our international correspondent, nic robertson is there. >> nic, if you've got us there. i'm hearing that you're seeing some action there. what news do you have? >> we're hearing heavy anti-aircraft gunfire as we heard last night and seeing tracer rounds fly up into the sky. this started about two or three minutes ago. these heavy anti-aircraft fire coming from a similar position that it was coming up from last night. when we heard missiles crash into the city. and as a consequence of that, we saw anti-aircraft gunfire fired up. we're seeing those then tracers, in the last couple of minutes. fly up here in the heavy anti-aircraft gunfire. it's gone quiet at the moment. the guns have stopped shooting at the moment. we can hear some smaller guns firing at this time. there
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
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